Q&A: AC SOLENOID (220VAC)?


AC SOLENOID (220VAC)?

WHERE CAN I FIND

AC SOLENOID (220VAC)
RATED PULL:50mm,
RATED STROKE: ABLE TO PULL 10mm THICK STAINLESS STEEL

COULD ANYBODY GIVE ME ANY HINT?
I'VE SEARCHED SO MANY COMPANIES LIKE; TRANSMOTEC,KHUNKE,BUHLER ETC.
IT COULD BE A SPECIAL PRODUCT .


Best answer:
Answer by Ecko
It is almost meaningless to say 'able to pull 10mm thick stainless steel". However it does give the indication that it is probably heavy, and needs significant force. The stroke is the distance it moves (50mm) and the pull is the force.

You need to state a force, which is in newtons - defined as the force needed to accelerate 1kg by 1m/s/s. A mass of 1kg used as a weight is 9.8N, because the acceleration due to gravity is 9.8m/s/s. You can use this to determine the force. Use a known weight to pull the stainless steel just as you intend the solenoid to do. Use a rope and a pulley to translate the direction of the force of the weight hanging down. Now calculate the force as:
F_Newton = Mass_kg x AccelerationOfGravity_9.8m/s/s
The magnetic force of the solenoid must exceed this at all parts of the stroke.

Typical stronger solenoids with laminated core provide 100N force minimum over 35mm. There are also duty cycles to consider. Many can only be on for a few seconds in a minute. A force of 100N represents about the same force as 10kg in gravity.

If this is not enough, consider other kinds of linear actuators like in the second link. These are typically an electric motor with a screw thread and limit switches, and work from a low voltage DC supply like a car battery. They move more slowly, which might be an advantage. There are also pneumatic (air) and hydraulic actuators. These are specified in kg weight in the link, which is the weight they can lift. Multiply by 9.8 to get newtons, so 41kg means 400N.

It is best to call a local supplier and ask the sales people, they are there to help.


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